Service/repair: Omega 265

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A client sent in this lovely Omega. It is not keeping very good time and needs some attention.

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Movement looks to be in good condition, the serial number dates this watch to about 1950.

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Watch is hardly ticking.

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Here you can see me taking apart the winding/setting mechanism.

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Lower balance staff is worn down to dust.

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The balance staff will need to be replaced.

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Here you can see the gear train layout with the train bridge removed.

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Old mainspring.

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I get a new balance staff

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Old balance staff removed.

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New balance staff fitted.

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The movement has been cleaned and I see that the new balance moves freely with the cap jewels put back in place.

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New mainspring

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Gear train back in place.

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Setting/winding mechanism going back in place.

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Base movement ready for the dial and hands.

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Great patinated dial. I have replaced the compound on the hands as the old compound was falling apart and had a badly toned repair.

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Movement is in excellent condition.

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Watch is now preforming much better!

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Very nice classic Omega!

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3 Responses to Service/repair: Omega 265

  1. andrew says:

    Great job Mitka – out of interest, in the re-cased movement photo the regulator is pointing fully ‘retarded’ – did it end up more in the middle once you’d regulated it? If not, would there be a reason for this?

    Like

    • mitka88 says:

      I could add weight to the balance wheel screws and slow it down and then poise the balance, so you can have the regulator in the middle, but that would take a lot of time, effort and is very risky (and I would charge extra). So much better to adjust the speed with the regulator;)

      Like

      • andrew says:

        Interesting, I guess in many instances with vintage watches you are reversing other previous watchmakers’ ‘tweaks’ and bodges that have happened along the way.

        Like

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